Nominees

The 15 nominees for Africa MediaWorks Photography Prize 2018 are:

Etinosa Yvonne

Nominated by Adenrele Sonariwo

Etinosa Yvonne is a self taught documentary photographer from Benin, Nigeria. Born in 1989, she is a member of the African Photojournalism Database and was selected in January 2018 to partake in The Nlele Institute 2 years’ photography mentorship program. Yvonne’s new series ‘It’s all in my HEAD’ explores the coping mechanisms of survivors of terrorism and violent conflict.

She says of the series: “In the last twenty years, Nigeria has witnessed an increase in terrorism and violent conflicts. Survivors have witnessed the most violent acts – on them, their loved ones and, in some cases, all they own.

“Over the years, these survivors have found a way to rebuild and adjust to their new lives. But many of them never get to talk about their experiences. A lot of survivors go through life burdened with thoughts of the things they witnessed and all they lost. By using layered portraits, I am exploring this experience.”

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Lakin Ogunbanwo

Nominated by Helen Jennings

Lakin Ogunbanwo is building an international reputation for his enigmatic bridging of both fashion and portraiture. Born in Lagos, he studied Law in Nigeria and the UK before moving into photography in 2012.

His has featured in such publications as the New York Times, i-D, GQ and Riposte and been recognised by the British Journal of Photography as one of 25 Ones to Watch.

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Stephen Tayo

Nominated by Adenrele Sonariwo

 

Stephen Tayo’s street photography of Lagos focuses on everyday fashion, childhood and the distinct character of his hometown.

He says: “I’m fascinated by how I come by distinctive beauty every day… Lagos has a great vibe, especially in terms of how people dress up naturally. There’s so much fashion in everyday looks.”

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Adama Jollah

Nominated by Helen Jennings

Adama Jollah grew up in South London, to parents from Sierra Leone. After completing a foundation diploma in Art and Design and LCC, Adama studied Commercial Photography at Arts University Bournemouth. Graduating in 2015, a string of awards followed, including a Paul Huf nomination and the BJP Breakthrough Award.

She told The Financial Times: “As a child of immigrants, my parents — particularly my dad — always made sure to tell me that despite being British by birth, I am Sierra Leonean and I should never forget it. I come from a religiously mixed household. My mother is Catholic and my father is Muslim. The more I think about my practise, the more I realise that answers about my identity are embedded in the photographs. Being black, British and African all play a part and I think it shows how all of these fused together form another identity.”

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Rahima Gambo

Nominated by Adenrele Sonariwo

Rahima Gambo is a Nigerian photographer who explores identity, history, memory, spirituality, healing through long term visual projects. As well as photography, she often experiments with text, illustration, video, sculpture and installation. Born in 1986, she is based in Abuja, Nigeria.

She says of this image: “Rukkaya and Hadiza remember having to hide their school uniforms in plastic bags because they feared becoming a target of Boko Haram. Maiduguri, Nigeria, 2016. The photograph is seen alongside a connect-the-dots style illustration from the book, “Progressive Coloring Book three” by Christopher G. Bakare. It purports to teach 12 psychological skills to students.”

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Logo Oluwamuyiwa Adeyemi

Nominated by Adenrele Sonariwo

Nigerian photographer Logo Oluwamuyiwa Adeyemi’s recent collection, Down The Rabbit Hole is an alternative romantic approach to the every day.

A filmmaker and photographer, Logor works with a monochromatic palette for his light and photographic installations.

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Campbell Addy

Nominated by Helen Jennings

British-Ghanaian photographer Campbell Addy’s debut solo show, Matthew 7:7&8, explored and celebrated sexuality and black British culture, and how it intersected with his Jehovah’s Witness upbringing.

A recent Central Saint Martins graduate, Addy’s highly stylised pictures have been featured in some of the fashion world’s boldest publications. His ambition and socially conscious sensibility extend to the two platforms he launched in 2016 – Nii Journal and Nii Agency, a culture magazine and a modelling agency.

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Alun [Be]

Nominated by Salimata DiopAlun [Be] was born in Dakar, Senegal and spent his childhood between France, the United States and West Africa. Alun’s personal projects focus on the human condition in public spaces, incited by his studies in San Francisco where he received his M.A. in Architecture.

Of the series Edification, he says: “Edification is an exploration of the impact of technology on society. The intention of this exhibit is to provide a visual narrative of faith in a digital future in which humanity teeters on the cusp of fully merging with technology.”

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Laeïla Adjovi

Nominated by Salimata Diop

Laeïla Adjovi is a Beninese and French national. Born in 1982, she grew up in Gabon and South Africa, studied political sciences and journalism in France and then lived in India and New Caledonia, before moving back to the continent. She lives and works in Dakar, Senegal.

In the past few years, her work was exhibited in Senegal, Morocco, Benin, France, South Africa and Ethiopia.

She says: “I’m a self-taught photographer interested in documentary photography and photojournalism. My themes relate to social issues, daily life on the continent or the African cultural heritage.”

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Kristin-Lee Moolman

Nominated by Helen Jennings

South African artist Kristin-Lee Moolman’s photography is capturing the idea of a ‘new Africa’. Having grown up in a “small Afrikaans town” before the end of apartheid, her work explores issues around sexuality and segregation. She is now based in Johannesburg.

She says: “I’m not making work that’s gonna change our political system or contest anything. It’s more a celebration of people and a utopian approach to the future.”

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Sarah Waiswa

Nominated by Rakeb Sile

Sarah Waiswa is a Ugandan born Kenya based documentary and portrait photographer with an interest in exploring identity on the African continent, particularly the New African Identity. After getting both sociology and psychology degrees and working in a corporate position for a number of years, she decided to pursue photography full time.

She says: “It was one of the hardest decisions I ever made but it feels great to do what I am passionate about. My desire is to illustrate the plight of various social issues on the continent, in a contemporary and non-traditional way. I hope to help change the narrative on Africa by generating dialogue on developing issues as they happen. I am passionate about creating visual poetry and telling stories in the most organic and creative way possible.”

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Michael Tsegaye

Nominated by Rakeb Sile

Michael Tsegaye lives and works in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. After completing a Diploma in painting in 2002, he switched to photography after developing an allergy to oil paint. Over the past decade, Tsegaye has documented the ever-changing physical and social landscape of Addis Ababa. Chasms of the soul: a shattered witness Series, Tsegaye explores the impermanent nature of seemingly permanent structures. Stunning images of gravestones in Ethiopia show how, as a result of time, those already buried continue to experience a second death; the gradual deterioration of their entombed identity. = This work is part a wider collection of works called ‘Future Memories’ where Tsegaye has attentively recorded the wider redevelopment of Addis Ababa.

He says: “As a photographer I try as much as possible to escape being pigeonholed. I place myself amongst my peers (painters and photographers) across the world. While the spirit of my culture – it’s traditions in music, poetry and literature – informs my photography, my goal is that of the artist: to understand my life and standpoint in the 21st century.”

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James Muriuki

Nominated by Rakeb Sile

James Muriuki, born 1977, is a Nairobi-based artist whose practice primarily revolves around the transition of society and the development of rapidly evolving urban space, whether in his native Nairobi or other spaces he encounters during his many trips and residencies.

His work focuses on the confluence of inter-dependent happenings in an ever changing social, economic and cultural landscape.

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Adeola Olagunju

Nominated by Adenrele Sonariwo

Adeola Olagunju is a Nigerian Artist who lives and works in Lagos, Nigeria.
After obtaining a degree in Fine and Applied Arts (Graphic Design) in 2009, Adeola worked as a Graphic Artist for Advertising Agencies in Lagos.

Working Primarily with Photography, her artistic practice encompasses a range of medium; including Video, Painting, and Collage. She explores themes around her Environment, Self and Memory with documentary and conceptual approach. Adeola has been on residencies at Kuona Trust Centre for Visual Art in Nairobi, Kenya and the Lagos Photo Summer School exchange programme in Berlin, Germany. She has participated in Photography Master classes and exhibitions locally and internationally.

She was the recipient of the Lagos Photo Festival Award in 2012 and the Young Art Fund Amsterdam Award in 2013.

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Sabelo Mlangeni

Nominated by Martin Barnes

Sabelo Mlangeni was born in 1980 in Driefontein near Wakkerstroom in Mpumalanga. In 2001 he moved to Johannesburg where he joined the Market Photo Workshop, graduating in 2004. He won the Tollman Award for the Visual Arts in 2009. Recent group exhibitions include Rise and Fall of Apartheid: Photography and the Bureaucracy of Everyday Life at Museum Africa, Johannesburg (extended until 30 April 2015); Distance and Desire: Encounters with the African Archive at the Walther Collection in Ulm, Germany (2013-2014). Public Intimacy: Art and Social Life in South Africa at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, San Francisco (2014); Apartheid and After at Huis Marseille, Amsterdam (2014); the Lubumbashi Biennale (2013); the Liverpool Biennial exhibition The Unexpected Guest (2012); 9th Rencontres de Bamako African Photography Biennial in Mali and the Lagos Photo Festival, Nigeria (both 2011); Appropriated Landscapes at the Walther Collection, Ulm, Germany (2011) and Figures and Fictions: Contemporary South African photography at the V&A Museum, London (2011).

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